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"A pretty face gets old. A nice body will change. But a good woman will always be a good woman."

Unknown (via a-place-to-stand)

(Source: tcjaye21, via illnomics)

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early-onset-of-night:

Two Pesticides You Probably Never Considered: Coke and PepsiIn the eastern Indian state of Chhattisgarh, farmers have been using Coke and Pepsi as pesticides on their crops with much success for several years now. I know nothing about Chhattisgarh, not even how to pronounce it, but I did look it up on Wikipedia and learned that its governor is Shekhar Dutt, which made me feel smarter.Using Coke and Pepsi as pesticides has proven so successful, especially from a cost standpoint, that sales of the sweet, syrupy drinks have skyrocketed in remote farming villages. Anupam Verma, Pepsi sales manager in Chhattisgarh, says sales figures in certain areas of the state have increased by more than 20%. The cola-as-pesticide trend appears to be happening in other parts of India as well.The cost of using ordinary pesticides in India is around 70 rupees per acre, whereas using Coke or Pepsi (diluted with water so as to not kill the plants) costs just 10 rupees per acre, a savings of 85%.This is not the first time the two big American colas and pesticides have come together in India. Back in 2006, unacceptable levels of pesticides were found in the drinks, resulting in a public relations nightmare for both Coke and Pepsi that is still (obviously) happening. Even the state of Kerala (Hansraj Bhardwaj, governor), home to 30 million people, temporarily banned the manufacture and sale of both drinks within its borders.A number of theories have popped up as to why using Coke or Pepsi as a pesticide works. One, put forward by agricultural specialist Devendra Sharma, goes something like this: The drinks, which are basically pure sugar, attract both a metric and standard crapload of ants. These ants in turn feast on the larvae of the pest bugs, reducing their numbers. Another theory by fellow scientist Sanket Thakur says that all the carbs in the colas strengthen and steel the plants, making them tougher and better able to withstand attacks from pests.My question is how did these farmers think to do this? How did it occur to them to spray Coke or Pepsi on their crop, in the hopes it would work as a pesticide? Was it because of the whole pesticides-in-Coke-and-Pepsi debacle of a few years ago?Nah, that couldn’t be it.Coke and Pepsi, of course, aren’t so keen on the idea of their supposed food products being used as bug poison. Vikas Kocchar, regional manager for public affairs and communications of Coca-Cola, says claims that the drink can be used as a pesticide have no scientific backing, while Anupam Verma, the Pepsi sales manager mentioned above, says the whole thing smacks of lies and is at best “idle natter”.“If there was any truth in these claims,” he added, “then we would rather be selling our product as a pesticide rather than soft drinks. There is more money in selling pesticides than in selling soft drinks.”So stay tuned, everybody.Me, I’m more of a Pepsi guy myself—and I’d be lying if I said this story hasn’t given me ideas for this coming summer’s garden. I wonder if our Coke and Pepsi has as much pesticide residue in it as Indian Coke and Pepsi? Perhaps I will need to double the dose (or half it).I particularly enjoy the Throwback variety of Pepsi, which uses a rare and mysterious ingredient called “real sugar”. Not as widely available as the high fructose corn syrup variety, it’s what I usually drink when I’m out of tea and beer.I even conducted an experiment one time with Pepsi. I drank half a bottle of real sugar Pepsi and half a bottle of high fructose corn syrup Pepsi and sat the two bottles on the counter without their lids to see how they’d rot.After a few days, mold appeared on the surface of the real sugar Pepsi, but not on the HFCS Pepsi. This is the God’s truth. Try it yourself and see. After more than ten days, no mold ever appeared on the HFCS Pepsi, but the natural sugar Pepsi became, quite literally, ghastly with mold. It rose thick and green from the brown surface of the liquid, craggy and mountainous, a miniature alien landscape. I also noticed that a cloud of fruit flies was hovering above it, whereas they seemed to be avoiding the HFCS stuff.After about twelve days, I threw both bottles away because I was having company over and didn’t want to gross them out. I concluded the experiment with a question: if bugs and fungus won’t eat something, should I?Anyway, I find this whole story of using Coke and Pepsi as pesticide delightfully entrepreneurial—in an even more delightful ‘screw you’ kind of way.share on Facebook :: more :: compleat books

early-onset-of-night:

Two Pesticides You Probably Never Considered: Coke and Pepsi

In the eastern Indian state of Chhattisgarh, farmers have been using Coke and Pepsi as pesticides on their crops with much success for several years now. I know nothing about Chhattisgarh, not even how to pronounce it, but I did look it up on Wikipedia and learned that its governor is Shekhar Dutt, which made me feel smarter.

Using Coke and Pepsi as pesticides has proven so successful, especially from a cost standpoint, that sales of the sweet, syrupy drinks have skyrocketed in remote farming villages. Anupam Verma, Pepsi sales manager in Chhattisgarh, says sales figures in certain areas of the state have increased by more than 20%. The cola-as-pesticide trend appears to be happening in other parts of India as well.

The cost of using ordinary pesticides in India is around 70 rupees per acre, whereas using Coke or Pepsi (diluted with water so as to not kill the plants) costs just 10 rupees per acre, a savings of 85%.

This is not the first time the two big American colas and pesticides have come together in India. Back in 2006, unacceptable levels of pesticides were found in the drinks, resulting in a public relations nightmare for both Coke and Pepsi that is still (obviously) happening. Even the state of Kerala (Hansraj Bhardwaj, governor), home to 30 million people, temporarily banned the manufacture and sale of both drinks within its borders.

A number of theories have popped up as to why using Coke or Pepsi as a pesticide works. One, put forward by agricultural specialist Devendra Sharma, goes something like this: The drinks, which are basically pure sugar, attract both a metric and standard crapload of ants. These ants in turn feast on the larvae of the pest bugs, reducing their numbers. Another theory by fellow scientist Sanket Thakur says that all the carbs in the colas strengthen and steel the plants, making them tougher and better able to withstand attacks from pests.

My question is how did these farmers think to do this? How did it occur to them to spray Coke or Pepsi on their crop, in the hopes it would work as a pesticide? Was it because of the whole pesticides-in-Coke-and-Pepsi debacle of a few years ago?

Nah, that couldn’t be it.

Coke and Pepsi, of course, aren’t so keen on the idea of their supposed food products being used as bug poison. Vikas Kocchar, regional manager for public affairs and communications of Coca-Cola, says claims that the drink can be used as a pesticide have no scientific backing, while Anupam Verma, the Pepsi sales manager mentioned above, says the whole thing smacks of lies and is at best “idle natter”.

“If there was any truth in these claims,” he added, “then we would rather be selling our product as a pesticide rather than soft drinks. There is more money in selling pesticides than in selling soft drinks.”

So stay tuned, everybody.

Me, I’m more of a Pepsi guy myself—and I’d be lying if I said this story hasn’t given me ideas for this coming summer’s garden. I wonder if our Coke and Pepsi has as much pesticide residue in it as Indian Coke and Pepsi? Perhaps I will need to double the dose (or half it).

I particularly enjoy the Throwback variety of Pepsi, which uses a rare and mysterious ingredient called “real sugar”. Not as widely available as the high fructose corn syrup variety, it’s what I usually drink when I’m out of tea and beer.

I even conducted an experiment one time with Pepsi. I drank half a bottle of real sugar Pepsi and half a bottle of high fructose corn syrup Pepsi and sat the two bottles on the counter without their lids to see how they’d rot.

After a few days, mold appeared on the surface of the real sugar Pepsi, but not on the HFCS Pepsi. This is the God’s truth. Try it yourself and see. After more than ten days, no mold ever appeared on the HFCS Pepsi, but the natural sugar Pepsi became, quite literally, ghastly with mold. It rose thick and green from the brown surface of the liquid, craggy and mountainous, a miniature alien landscape. I also noticed that a cloud of fruit flies was hovering above it, whereas they seemed to be avoiding the HFCS stuff.

After about twelve days, I threw both bottles away because I was having company over and didn’t want to gross them out. I concluded the experiment with a question: if bugs and fungus won’t eat something, should I?

Anyway, I find this whole story of using Coke and Pepsi as pesticide delightfully entrepreneurial—in an even more delightful ‘screw you’ kind of way.

share on Facebook :: more :: compleat books

(via nefermaathotep)

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"‘Each day we wake in the morning with a thought in our minds. This thought, whatever it may be, sets the tone for the rest of the day. This is not always a good thing as we may wake up in a rush for work or school, with a hangover, feeling depressed or generally in a state of confusion. Therefore it is a good idea to learn how to create an original thought to begin each day, and to make the day a perfect expression of your original thought.’"

— The Tibetan Art of Positive Thinking (via modelsmadeofplasticene)

(Source: quote-book, via illnomics)

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lazyyogi:

Beautiful native american wisdom. I first heard this tale in a native american course at uni

(Source: zenpencils.com, via illnomics)

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oldblueeyes:

CHRIS GUILLEBEAU: 11 ways to be average (x)

(via realmatic)

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djauditory:

thefontnazi:

japesofwrath:

howiviewafrica:

A Urine Powered Generator. An amazing accomplishment by four brilliant girls. The girls are are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15).
 
 
  • 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity.

  • The system works like this:

    • Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen.
    • The hydrogen goes into a water filter for purification, which then gets pushed into the gas cylinder.
    • The gas cylinder pushes hydrogen into a cylinder of liquid borax, which is used to remove the moisture from the hydrogen gas.
    • This purified hydrogen gas is pushed into the generator.

This is amazing. Give them a billion dollars right now. They may have just saved the planet. 

folks are doing a PISS poor job of reblogging this.

BROOOOOO!!!

(via illnomics)

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How often do you stop and FEEL your heart beating? Like really FEEL that you are HERE NOW! ALIVE and full of life! As far as I’m concerned your heartbeat shows that you are still connected to the DIVINE power source.  It shows that even though yesterday did not go your way, you still have NOW to make things right! Feel your heartbeat, breathe fresh air, and get in tune with what you REALLY want out of life.  So long as your heart is beating you still have a shot at GREATNESS!
Peace

How often do you stop and FEEL your heart beating? Like really FEEL that you are HERE NOW! ALIVE and full of life! As far as I’m concerned your heartbeat shows that you are still connected to the DIVINE power source.  It shows that even though yesterday did not go your way, you still have NOW to make things right! Feel your heartbeat, breathe fresh air, and get in tune with what you REALLY want out of life.  So long as your heart is beating you still have a shot at GREATNESS!

Peace

Text

Quick Thought: “Acting White”

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

We’ve been asked about “acting White”.

Here’s our take on it… it’s a fucking stupid statement.

It’s stupid because…

  1. This is stating that White people are the ultimate standard when it comes to human culture and intelligence.
  2. That sounding intelligent is a crime.
  3. That being ignorant is a specialty.

Please… stop giving White people all the damn credit. They can be stupid (even more so) than the rest of us.

(Source: whatwhiteswillneverknow, via nefermaathotep)

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Beautiful…

Beautiful…

(Source: hadtoomuchtodreamlastnight, via illnomics)